Pumas are simply following the money

When the Sex Pistols reformed in 1996 they offered no pretence as to why, naming their comeback the “Filthy Lucre” tour.

On Saturday evening just under 50,000 people watched Argentina lose to Australia in the Southern hemisphere Rugby Championship. The game was played at Twickenham Stadium, London, England.

When Australia last played Argentina away the game was staged in Mendoza in front of 25,000. When the two sides met in Perth last month fewer than 17,000 turned up. The last four matches between Australia and Argentina in the tournament have been watched by fewer than 72,000 spectators.

Argentina may have been a bit more delicate than the Sex Pistols about their decision to sacrifice home advantage and play Australia at Twickenham, but it all adds up to the same thing – money.

 

With Sanzar’s desire to have the income generated by Test matches between tier one nations pooled, including Lions tours, understandably not generating much support in Europe, Saturday could be seen as a foretaste of matches to come.

On hearing that Argentina would be playing Argentina at Twickenham, England’s Ben Young‘s reaction was: “I couldn’t imagine going to Melbourne to play a test against Ireland.” But the point is England have no need to leave Twickenham to attract a big crowd.

New Zealand have already played Australia in Hong Kong and will take on Ireland in Chicago this autumn as part of their bid to tap into new markets and broaden their commercial base. England’s advice to the World Champions was to build a new, suitably large, stadium rather than take tests around a country that is made up of two islands – an attitude that suggests the R.F.U. is not too bothered about how their supporters in the northern part of the country manage to get to Twickenham and back up to six or seven times a year. Ian Ritchie, the RFU chief executive, refuses even to countenance a match in the north of England, never mind North America.

 

If England laugh at the suggestion Test match income should be pooled, how would they react to a request by New Zealand to play a match at Twickenham? By demanding a high rental fee probably. But if the friendly international calendar changes after 2019 so that neither hemisphere has to embark on an end-of-season tour, then end of August into September could become the window for what are now the autumn and summer series, blending the two into one. The All Blacks could play England at Twickenham on consecutive weekends, or Wales in Cardiff or France in Paris, away in the first and home in the second, thereby banking far more than they would for a match at Eden Park

 

Club borders are already expanding. The Aviva Premiership ventured into the United States last season when London Irish played Saracens in New Jersey. The French Top14 played its final last year at the Nou Camp in Barcelona in front of a full house.

Players have moved from the south to the north in ever growing numbers in the professional era, following the money just as their countries now are. Oregan Hoskins, the former president of South African Rugby, said recently that he believed South Africa should leave Sanzar (and therefore Super Rugby and the Rugby Championship) and link up with the European unions, taking advantage of the same time zone. He is speaking against a backdrop in his country of falling gates, fewer television viewers and the loss of sponsors.

The figures may mean that South Africa heed Hopkins’s advice and act out of self-interest rather than solidarity. If he had floated his idea a generation ago, when the south was the powerhouse of the game on the field and in the bank he would have been laughed at.  But not anymore, which is why Argentina and Australia, two countries not in Europe’s time zone were playing in London on the money trail.

 

 

Mike Miles

 

www.scrumdown.org.uk

 

mike.miles@scrumdown.org.uk

 

 

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